Let’s Talk with Diane A.S. Stuckart

I’ve Got Your Number
By Diane A.S. Stuckart

I don’t know about you, but I’m pretty chuffed about the year 2020. Not that anything terribly special has happened to me since January 1. It’s more the whole symmetry thing with the numbers 2-0-2-0. You know the anticipation when you’re waiting for your car’s odometer to roll over to a nice even number with a lot of zeroes? For me, spending midnight December 31 watching the calendar roll over to a number as balanced as 2020 was equally satisfying.

And that doesn’t even take into account that, for the first time since the year 2000, we’ve hit Roman numerals that are equally gratifying. How simple is it to remember MMXX as compared to, say, MCMXCVIII (which, if it’s been awhile for you since Latin class, is 1998)? Continuing that theme, we’ve now reached the 20th year of the 3rd millennium, are observing the 20th year of the 21st century, and—depending on how you count it—are marking the 1st year of the 2020s decade (we purists won’t actually celebrate the ‘20s until 2021). I’m already super jealous of all those babies who will be born on 02/02/2020 and 02/20/2020. With numbers like those, it would almost be fun filling out official forms requiring one’s date of birth.

And let’s not forget the popularity of categorizing things by twenty. We play “Twenty Questions” and make “Top Twenty” lists. Twenty of something is a score, and scoring (no, not that kind!) is always good. I also read that a Rubik’s Cube can be solved in twenty moves, not that I’ve ever actually attempted that. I will say I was disappointed to learn that there’s no special word for a period of twenty years (though if ten years are a decade, maybe we can call twenty years a duocade).

But one of the most familiar uses of the number twenty is the way we explain perfect vision. Given that, you could view the year 2020—or, 20/20—as a harbinger of sorts. Maybe 2020 will be a year when we proceed clear-eyed into the future. And that’s definitely something to look forward to.

So, do you believe numbers have significance…and do you have any particular number obsession?

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Comments

  1. I don’t live my life by numerology, but I find it fascinating. Five is “my” number – and 14, 23, 32, etc. I’ve always liked the number 13, and Friday the 13th is usually a great day. The number 7 shows up around me a good deal, too. And, yes, I do smile when I happen to catch 11:11 on the clock – or even 12:12. I’ve been excited about 2020 for several reasons, and the symmetry is one aspect that gives me a lift. Thanks for a fun and thoughtful post, Diane!

  2. Sara Williams says

    Interesting, Diane. I’ve been contemplating 2008 for some time, the year of the great real estate market crash and the fate of Vincent Lutrini, oracle of the market rise who turns pariah of the crash. in fact, he’s SWAMPED.

  3. authorlois says

    I’m with Nancy on this. I don’t feel any connection to numbers other than for scientific and mathematical purposes. Numerology is part of the woo-woo world, IMHO, along with astrology, Fung Shui, phrenology, and fortunetelling, probably because I’ve seen too many gullible people scammed by practitioners of these “arts”.

    • Well, actually, I think there’s a lot to Feng Shui if you skip the mirrors and red envelopes. Ever walked into a room that’s dark and cluttered, and you feel almost suffocated? Stagnant chi — you get rid of the junk, clear the room, open the curtains and windows and, voila, you feel much better. I’m not big on numerology and astrology, though. With Cesarean birth, you can basically be born whenever your mom wants you to be born, which sort of negates the whole destiny thing, LOL

      • LOL! To me that’s just common sense, Diane. My eyes roll when I watch HGTV and see people who won’t buy a house because the staircase is too close to the front door, the house doesn’t face in the right direction, or the house number is wrong.

  4. maggietoussaint says

    The computer ate my reply. It must not have liked the way I was talking about numbers. I am interested in number patterns, in that the symmetry catches my eye, same as the way colors in a landscape catch my eye. But because I like like patterns of numbers, it doesn’t follow that I like math, per se. It’s a necessary element to everyday life. But numbers in the purest sense are golden to me.

  5. My head spun while considering all of this lol–I am not a numbers girl! But if it makes you happy? That’s good enough for me 🙂

  6. My eyes glaze over when you rattle off all those numbers. My mother used to say things happened in threes. Is this true? Sometimes, but it can be a self-fulfilling prophecy. Numbers have significance in science, math and astronomy. I don’t feel any connection to them otherwise.

    • Nancy, I’m actually with you. I don’t like “using” numbers but I like looking at them. Supposedly celebrity deaths occur in threes. We just lost Kirk Douglas so two more are due to check out. 🙁

  7. I love the symmetry of numbers. This year’s Groundhog Day was a palindrome! 02022020 Lovely. I am also sentimental and/or obsessive (you choose) about the final word count in my manuscripts. One was 70707, another was 73737, and my favorite was 76767. Do you see an aircraft theme? Great topic, Diane.

    • Ha! Never thought of trying to be symmetrical with my MS word count but now that I’m in the middle of edits I think I’ll shoot for that, just for good luck!