Let’s Talk with James M Jackson

What’s Your Hobby?
by James M Jackson

jmj-20160612_0034aWhen asked that question in the presence of my better half, she’ll roll her eyes and say something like, “He has serial passions.” What she means is that I get interested (okay, really interested) in something, will stick with it for some time, and then gradually that interest fades and I pick up something else. Over the more than twenty years we have been together, we can agree on many examples including (alphabetically) backgammon, birding, bridge, golf, guitar (playing), photography, reading, recorder (playing), singing (choir and ensemble), song-writing. I’m sure there were some others.

I justify this character trait in several ways. I am curious, always love learning new things, so when something attracts my attention, I’d like to learn more. At some stage, however, to continue to improve at the activity will require a significant increase in effort. Sometimes I’m willing to make that effort (writing fiction is an example). Most times, the level of commitment required would convert what had been a hobby into a chore. Then I back away.

While other hobbies have waxed and waned over the years, I have always been and foresee myself always being a reader. What I read may vary from year-to-year, but as long as I can see and comprehend, I expect to be a reader.

What about you, what’s your enduring hobby?

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Comments

  1. I’m a lifelong reader and writer, but I also enjoy cooking. My husband and I take cooking classes together, and we especially like the ones at Publix where they give you a different wine to taste with each course. We do the demo classes where the chefs do all the work and we get to eat the results. I still like to experiment and make new dishes although it’s just the two of us. Critique group will often get something different to try when they come to my house. Sometimes it turns out well, and sometimes not so much.

    • James M. Jackson says

      My mother always tried new recipes on company — with similar results to you, Nancy.

  2. Hubster is a serial hobbyest. Trouble is, his interests fizzle too rapidly. He has a 25 year old bike with about 20 miles on it; there’s a fitness pull-up bar thingie in the downstairs closet doorway–he spent more time installing it than using it. He got into guns when we moved up to Colorado, but he’s probably fired them a dozen times or less. He’s stuck with birding and photography, though.

    As for me, I gave up needlepoint when I ran out of room on my walls, and knitting when we moved to Florida because it was too hot, and sewing once the kids outgrew my attempts at Stretch and Sew projects. Reading has always stuck with me, and writing has morphed into more of a “career” than a hobby, I’d say.

    • jmjackson054 says

      My better half needlepoints as well. If people buy her the kits they want made, she’ll do them. Also does them based off photographs I’ve taken.

  3. maggietoussaint says

    I don’t know that I’m a serial hobbyist, in fact, I tend to hand onto all my hobbies. The only thing that’s lapsed in recent years has been sewing. It just takes up too much flat space that I need for other things! My active hobbies right now include reading, writing, Sudoku, crosswords, adult coloring books, all arts and crafts, singing, guitar playing, yoga, and boating. I’ve outgrown some hobbies, like bogging in the mud and riding horses in sleeping bags, but with one glaring exception (martial arts), I’ve never met a hobby I didn’t like!

  4. Ah yes. Writing for me too. But I do remember it was a choice to continue, knowing that to take it seriously would require I give up less passionate pursuits. I have been “into” many things, but the ones that have stuck also include running (because I have determined I will never get better at it and that’s cool) tarot reading (because even though it requires a lifetime of study, it requires only a deck of cards to put in that time) and yoga.

    • jmjackson054 says

      Good that you decided that about running. Those who don’t end up pulling muscles and suffering other more serious injuries trying to improve after the point of no (or at least diminished) return.

  5. My hobbies lended themselves more to athletic pursuits. The one that stuck? The one I put more effort in until it was no longer a hobby but a vocation? The writing thing